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Project TitleNanomaterials for Additive-free Li-Ion Battery Electrodes
Track Code6022
Short Description

A simple robust way was developed to fabricate nanoparticle assemblies for lithium-ion battery electrodes that are free of polymeric binders and carbon.

Abstract

Material scientists at Cornell University have developed a simple robust way to fabricate nanoparticle assemblies for lithium-ion battery electrodes that are free of polymeric binders and carbon. The battery capacity/weight ratio is improved by eliminating these additives in the fabrication process. The technique uses electrophoretic deposition, which binds the metal nanoparticles to the surface of the electrode substrate and to each other in an assembly, creating strong electrical contacts between the particles and current collector. Once attached the nanoparticles are no longer soluble and are mechanically robust; creating a nanoparticle film that has superior mechanical stability when compared to films fabricated by conventional battery-making methods that require the use of binders. This concept was demonstrated on the first cobalt-oxide nanoparticle-film battery electrode made without binders and carbon black additives, which shows high gravimetric and volumetric capacities, even after 50 cycles.

 

Applications: Nanoparticle electrodes for lithium-ion batteries

 

Advantages:

  • Microthick battery electrode reaches theoretical capacity without additives
  • Reduces weight and volume of nanoparticle batteries
  • Nanoparticles maximize the battery performance
  • Creates mechanically stable assemblies which have not been achieved by any other technique before.
  • Assemblies remain intact when immersed in chemical solutions.
  • Assemblies are mechanically stable after at least 50 (fatigue) cycles.
 
Tagsalternative & green energy, batteries, chemicals, cleantech, energy, films, materials, Nano-microparticles, nanotechnology
 
Posted DateApr 2, 2013 11:21 AM

Researcher

Name
Richard Robinson
Don Hyung Ha

Additional Information

Licensing Contact

Carolyn Theodore

cat42@cornell.edu

607-254-4514