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Project TitleSystem for Increased Cooling Rates of Large Volumes of Cells for Optimized Cryopreservation
Track Code4001
Short Description

Physics researchers have invented an improved system and method for faster cooling and warming of biological samples with greater survival rates and higher process efficiency.

Abstract

Physics researchers have invented an improved system and method for faster cooling and warming of biological samples with greater survival rates and higher process efficiency. The fundamental keys to achieving these improvements are:

  1. Removing the cold gas layer that forms above the liquid cryogen and replacing it with dry gas at ambient temperature.
  2. Maximizing heat transfer rates from the sample by maximizing its surface-to-volume ratio by either:
    1. Sequentially freezing a large number of small drops, or
    2. freezing mixtures contained in small-diameter, thin walled tubes
  3. Using cryoprotective solutions that allow thermal expansion matching of the cell constituents and the internal and external liquids.

Current methods utilize slow cooling rates. To cool cells slowly and avoid hexagonal or cubic ice formation, very high, and often harmful concentrations of cryoprotectants must be used. The faster cooling rates enabled by this invention eliminates the need for high concentrations of cryoprotectants.

 

Potential Applications

  • Cryopreservation of cell and tissue samples including:
    • Semen, blood, stem cells, oocytes, embryos, histological cross sections
  • Biological, environmental and medical research
  • Sperm and tissue banks

 

Advantages

  • Higher survival rate for biological samples after cryopreservation
  • Faster cooling/warming rates than convention methods (100X)
  • Reduced cryoprotectant concentrations required
    • Less osmotic stress and cell toxicity
    • Shorter preparation time
  • Less mechanical stress on sample
 
TagsApplied, life science, materials, physics, superconductors, lab test, medical diagnostics (in vitro)
 
Posted DateJul 25, 2012 9:05 PM

Researcher

Name
Robert Thorne
Scott Macfarlane
Matthew Warkentin

Additional Information

Patent Application: PCT/US07/79996

Licensing Contact

Patrick Govang
pjg26@cornell.edu
(607) 254-2330