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Project TitleMethod of Modulating Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability
Track Code4156
Short Description

The present invention relates to a method of increasing blood brain barrier permeability.

 

Abstract

The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is an exclusive component of the endothelium of cerebral capillaries, where tight junctions tightly regulate the internal environment of the brain by preventing substances in the blood from crossing into the brain. While the integrity of the BBB is critical to prevent the entry of toxic substances and inflammatory cells into the brain, it also impedes access of many pharmacological agents to cerebral tissues. In fact, BBB permeability is frequently a rate-limiting factor for the penetration of drugs or peptides into the central nervous system.

 

In studying experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a well-established mouse model of multiple sclerosis (MS), Cornell researchers have unlocked a mechanism of regulating BBB permeability to molecules and inflammatory cells. Studies eliciting EAE in mice clearly demonstrate that modulating BBB permeability directly affects disease manifestation.

 

Potential Applications

Controlling BBB permeability has implications in:

  • Developing new treatments for neuroinflammatory diseases, including multiple sclerosis
  • Developing safer and more efficacious pharmaceutical agents for the treatment of CNS diseases
  • Screening and selection of pharmaceutical agents in animal models of CNS disease

  

 
Tagsautoimmune, BBB crossing agent-method, CNS & PNS, Diseases & Treatment Areas, life science, proteins, small molecule, drug leads, Startup Opportunity
 
Posted DateJul 23, 2012 5:58 PM

Researcher

Name
Margaret Bynoe

Additional Information

  • Patent Application US2009/036671; issued patent in China ZL200980117596.0
  • Mills JH et al. (2008). CD73 is required for efficient entry of lymphocytes into the central nervous system during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. PNAS vol. 105; no. 27; 9325-9330.

Licensing Contact

Phillip Owh
po62@cornell.edu
607-254-4508